holiday

5 Reasons Not to Blog During the Holidays

The holiday season is upon us. We are right in the thick of it. And as much as I love this time of year, I find myself quoting this line from Christmas Vacation: “I don’t know what to say, except it’s Christmas and we’re all in misery.”

 

Ok it’s really not that bad… but I get it, and do laugh every time I say it.

 

Here are my top 5 reasons for slacking on my blog:

#5 – I am too busy actually baking for events to record them. Veritas.

#4 – We are studying and readying for Christmas concerts… Christmas Pageants… Christmas parties… and attending them. It’s chaos. It’s a lot of “What? You are supposed to have Christmas pajamas for your concert TOMORROW?”; “I don’t know, the shepherds probably wore sandals, but you are going to where your brown boots.”; “By the way we need to find a long sleeve brown shirt for Noah’s costume THIS AFTERNOON”; “Where are your socks?”; “I haven’t seen your coat. Where did you take it off?”; AAAAAAAHHH!

All four of my children made it into this closing scene; two shepherds, Mary and an inn keeper.

#3 – I am shopping for presents! Not even close to being done. And I waste time trying to think of… “who I can get this pineapple measuring set from Anthropologie for?”

 

#2 – All I want to do is be lazy. It’s the truth. I just want to crawl under a blanket and do nothing. Just leave me be.

#1 – My babies have been sick. Who has time for trips to Urgent Care and the ER? Not me. But somehow we manage to fit them in.

Virus induced asthma attacks are awful!

It’s all worthwhile.

My niece singing and playing Silent Night. Love.

Loving Lately 🎅🏻

There aren’t enough hours in the day to make all of the Christmas cookies on my list. Also, I don’t think I could possibly fit in the exercise to balance the caloric intake. But I really want to try (the first part). Thank you Aisha Yusaf for perfectly capturing the essence of my cookie desire in the featured image with your Jam Tarts.

How much more holiday does it get than Cranberry Orange Shortbread Cookies from Mom on Timeout? I think everyone in Michigan has a relative who lives in Florida who sends or brings them a bag of oranges this time of year. (Maybe I’m naive.) And why does a mom timeout sound like a vacation? I could use a vacation, with a box of shortbread cookies.

I’m kind of crazy about biscotti. I could do a whole post on biscotti alone (and probably will). This Gingerbread Biscotti from If You Give A Blonde a Kitchen, sounds like the perfect dose of Christmas medicine… along with a coffee creamed with egg nog. (Disclaimer: I’m not a doctor, I just like to play one on my blog.)

Of course, there are the traditional sugar cookies (I’ll be posting a recipe soon). I have neither the patience nor the talent to make them as intricate as these. But wouldn’t they be awesome to serve? I’d be like “Oh, these little things… I just whipped them together…” I would really like to give someone the credit that is due… unfortunately, they got lost in the world of Pinterest.

Have you guys and gals checked out the blog, Once Upon A Chef? It’s really worth mentioning. My friends and I haven’t been disappointed by anything we’ve made from it. And I’m really looking forward to trying these Gingerbread Men, because I bet they are as delicious as they are adorable. Although, I know of one little boy who’s going to be very upset this year if one doesn’t run out of the oven when we sneak a peek.

My blogging friend, Marisa of Marisa’s Italian Kitchen, is wildly talented. Everything she does looks like it came out of a magazine… including these Chocolate Raspberry Cream Cheese Cookies. Aren’t they gorgeous? She makes biscotti too, just sayin’.

It just wouldn’t be the holiday season without Pecan Balls, such as these beauties from A Healthy Life For Me. You know, they have to be passed in a tissue lined tin… or displayed like a pyramid. And if by chance you happen to take a breath before you bite into one, you will probably choke on powdered sugar. Good times… The best of times!

Merry Christmas Cookies!

Christmas Mantel Before & After

It really is the most wonderful time of the year. Christmas is almost here! It’s time to bring out all that sparkles and shines, all the red and the green, all that smells like gingerbread and pine… I can’t help it, I love this stuff. So when I was contacted by Wayfair to share the transformation of our mantel from drab to fab, plain to off-the-chain (or in reality- just everyday to holiday), I was like, “Count me in!”

I really wish I could have shown you an awesome shot of my autumn-themed mantel, (that wasn’t in existence) before our Christmas transformation. We technically did have a couple small pumpkins that sat on the mantel that I removed right before my youngest son’s birthday party. Actually, I also had to remove the “Minion” balloons to get the following picture. But it gives you an idea of what our mantel might look like on any given day.

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I’ll admit, it looks a little minimalist.

And now with a sprinkling of Christmas cheer! (Drumroll please…)

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You know those picturesque Christmas cards that feature the stockings hung by the chimney with care? Of course, I have to do that too. (Side note: I actually didn’t grow up with a fireplace in our home, and my mother always made it feel like a Christmas card.) Our mantel is a collage of new and old. It’s playful and colorful for the kids, but holds nostalgia for the adults in the house. (I could probably give a small historical account of each item.) Mostly what I love about this decorated area is the sentimental attachment, starting with the fact that my grandpa made this mantel for my grandmother with his own two hands. And I love that this fireplace is a part of all of my childhood Christmas memories and now I get to share that with my children.

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My mom used to hang this plate in our house during the Christmas season over 30 years ago. It actually was in a set of three Christmas dishes that made a regular appearance. I always thought it was so cute. Every dish told it’s own story (in not so many words), the kind of imaginative story you create in your head. There’s no reason not to keep that custom alive. If you’re looking to start one, check out the dishes found here!

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The wooden nutcrackers are part of a tradition my husband and I have started with our children. My oldest son loves to change the numbers for the Christmas countdown. Of course all of the kids love to open their mouths (pull their beards) and adjust all moveable pieces. Classic.

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I know you remember those Santa Bears from the 80’s. We had them. That’s what this bear reminds me of, except the originals were white with those red knitted hats, but every bit as cute and fluffy. This little drummer bear belonged to my husband’s family. I honestly don’t know how the bear became so intertwined with Christmas… but it’s a thing.

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My in-laws gifted us this globe last year. It was an instant favorite. Everyone needs a Christmas globe that comes to snowy life after you tip it upside-down and place it backside-right. If you don’t have one yet, click on the link to check out this must-have! (And if you look closely at the one in this picture, you can see our pool closed for the winter. Like magic… but not.)

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My great-aunt Shirley made this a few years back. She used to make quilts, and had given one to our family when I was young. When I went away to college, it was the only blanket I wanted to bring with me. I guess it just reminded me of family. So, this little handmade tree is priceless; it embodies the spirit of Christmas that just can’t be bought.

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I’ve always loved the Charlie Brown Christmas story (hence all of the stuffed characters). It’s just such a part of my Christmas heritage. (And by the way, Wayfair has a plethora of related options… I’m particularly crazy about the painting of Linus with a wreath.) My parents recorded their voices reading  A Charlie Brown Christmas a couple years ago. It’s the most wonderful/awful gift they have ever given. Of course they had in mind that it will live on after they are gone; so I cry every time we listen to it. (They are still alive and well. I’m ridiculous, I know.) I’m also scared to death that my kids are going to accidentally push a button and erase the whole thing. So on the mantel, out-of-reach, it stays.

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Thank you Wayfair for allowing me to share our Christmas mantel transformation with you! Season’s Greetings!

Recovery

What’s the allotted amount of time for holiday recovery? Specifically 2 Thanksgiving dinners, a four day weekend with the kids,

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and a birthday party?

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Because Minion Bob and I are beat.

The Pioneer Woman’s Popcorn Balls

I love it when a plan comes together. Or is it when a plan fails miserably? I can’t remember. This is a plan almost three years in the making. The year that The Pioneer Woman released her A Year of Holidays Cookbook, I knew I was going to make these popcorn balls. I don’t celebrate Halloween, but I do celebrate a lot of life with food. And I don’t eat candy corn. In fact, I only knew one person who did. She ate a whole bag in one sitting and made herself sick, and probably hasn’t eaten them again. But as soon as I saw the picture of these yellowed marshmallowy popcorn balls with those striped triangled candies, I knew this was meant to be. Here’s the unfortunate thing- if you don’t buy your candy corn before Halloween, you will not find it in stores until the next year. I know this to be true, two years in a row. So when I saw an “Autumn Mix” bag of Brach’s candy while waiting in the checkout lane of a local grocery store, I knew I would have no problem removing those little sugar pumpkins so I could get one full cup of candy corns. This was the year.

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1/4 cup Peanut oil
6 Tbsp Popcorn kernels
1/2 cup Sugar
4 Tbsp (1/2 stick) Butter
6 oz. mini Marshmallows (about 2/3 package)
Orange food coloring (optional)
1 cup Candy Corn
1/2 cup shelled unsalted Peanuts
Cooking spray

I poured the oil in a large sauce pan (with a tight fitting lid) over a medium-high heat. I added the popcorn and shook the pan gently to make sure the kernels were coated with oil.

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When I heard the oil start to sizzle (before any corn started popping) I added the sugar to the pan. Without instruction, I stirred the sugar and the kernels because it felt like the right thing to do. Then I shook the pan to even out the kernels on the bottom. I shook the pan again, just like I was told when I saw the first couple kernels. But I noticed that my sugar had started to caramelize and The Pioneer Woman’s picture didn’t look like that… So, I started to question my urge to stir that sugar. Or maybe mine started to brown because I used organic cane sugar? Perhaps my medium-high heat is higher than hers? We may never know.

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I placed the lid on my pan, holding it in place while I gently shook the pan as the corn was popping. When I noticed the popping slowing down, I removed it from the heat. I took off the lid to unveil the sweet surprise.

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Then I poured it onto a parchment paper-lined baking sheet to let the popcorn cool. I did my best to sort out unpopped kernels (and said a prayer that my kids wouldn’t break a tooth if I missed one, because this is a sticky mixture and I didn’t feel confident in my separating skills). Also, I threw away the darkest colored (aka burnt) pieces of popped corn, because even though I like burned popcorn, as I have mentioned before, my family does not.

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While the popcorn was cooling, I melted butter in a separate pot over a low heat. I noticed that The Pioneer Woman used an enamel lined cast iron pot, so I did too. (Because when I grow up I’m going to be just like her.) I added the marshmallows, stirring them while they melted. On the side, I started to sort out those candy corns and separate them from the candy pumpkins. I got this.

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The marshmallows were starting to lose their shape, so everything was going according to plan. Another suggestion from The Pioneer Woman was the option of orange food coloring. My pantry’s current all natural food coloring in store was yellow, but I added a few drops anyway to mask all of the white. My marshmallows weren’t melting completely very quickly… So I left them on the heat for a minute while I went to the pantry to look for the peanuts, because that’s how I roll. (My mise en place could use a little help.) And as soon as I turned my back, my son dumped the measuring cup full of candy corn into the marshmallow mix. NOOOO!

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Well, I tried to recover as best as I could and added the popcorn right away too. But those candy corns started to melt. Argh! So much for needing food coloring… we were going for a traditional pinky orange right? I tried to quickly yet gently mix it all up. (It was a pot of chaos.) I removed the it all from the heat, added the nuts and tried to sort through the bag for a few more candy corns- so you actually see a couple.

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I sprayed my hands with the spray as directed and started forming those marshmallow balls of gooey madness. And please note that the marshmallow is HOT. Oh, I felt it.

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But, all’s well that ends well, right?

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Because we still had fun eating them… Show that marshmallow popcorn ball who’s boss!

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The Pioneer Woman’s Popcorn Balls

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Peanut oil
  • 6 Tbsp Popcorn kernels
  • 1/2 cup Sugar
  • 4 Tbsp (1/2 stick) Butter
  • 6 oz. mini marshmallows (about 2/3 package)
  • Orange food coloring (optional)
  • 1 cup Candy Corn
  • 1/2 cup shelled unsalted Peanuts
  • Cooking spray

Instructions

  1. Add oil to a medium (large) sauce pan that has a tight fitting lid over medium-high heat.
  2. Add the popcorn and shake the pan gently, coating all of the kernels with oil.
  3. When the oil starts to sizzle, add the sugar.
  4. Shake the pan again, and when the first kernels start to pop, cover with the lid. Hold the lid in place, while you gently shake the pot with your other hand.
  5. When the popping slows down, and almost all kernels have popped, pour the popcorn onto a parchment paper-lined baking sheet.
  6. Separate and remove the un-popped kernels with a spoon or spatula.
  7. Let the popcorn cool.
  8. While the popcorn is cooling, melt the butter in another pot over low heat.
  9. Add the marshmallows, stirring as they melt.
  10. When the marshmallows are almost melted, add 2 or 3 drops of orange food coloring. (Optional)
  11. Stir.
  12. Remove the pot from the heat and add the popcorn. Stir immediately to coat as quickly as possible.
  13. Add the candy corn and peanuts.
  14. Gently stir until candy and nuts are worked in.
  15. Spray your hands lightly with cooking spray and form balls 2-3 inches in diameter.
  16. Set them aside and let them cool completely.
  17. Serve at room temperature.
https://sadiesnest.com/the-pioneer-womans-popcorn-balls/

Date Bar Dessert

When Owen and I got married, I was excited about learning to cook. Finally, I had my own kitchen! At my wedding shower, a longtime family friend gave me the instructions for her favorite brownies written on a recipe card (along with her gift) and on the day of our wedding, one of my sister’s high school friends gave us The Best of Country Cooking 2001 by Taste of Home. She had glued on the front page “A Recipe for a Happy Marriage” and a hand written note. That was where it all began. I love that cookbook, it’s full of memories and sentiment. It also contains the recipe for Date Bar Dessert, one of the first desserts I brought as a newlywed to our Thanksgiving family gathering. Of course, it’s always exciting when people enjoy what you’ve made! (It’s hard to go wrong with oats, butter, brown sugar and sticky sweet dried fruit.) Owen and I recently celebrated our 15th wedding anniversary, so I happily share this gift with you! In time for the holidays I might add, although on any given day it really makes for a delicious breakfast with a cup of coffee. Just sayin’.

As organic as possible:

1 3/4 cups old-fashioned Oats

1 1/2 cups all-purpose Flour

1 cup packed Brown Sugar

1 tsp Baking soda

1/2 tsp salt

1 cup cold Butter

2 1/2 cups chopped Dates

3/4 cup Sugar

3/4 cup Water

1/2 cup chopped Walnuts

Preheat oven to 350°.

In a large bowl, combine oats, flour, brown sugar, baking soda and salt. Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. *I prefer the old school two knives instead of a pastry cutter for this large amount, but do as you please.

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Press into a greased 13″ x 9″ x 2″ baking pan.

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In a saucepan, combine dates, sugar and water.

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Cook for 10 minutes or until thickened, stirring frequently. Stir in walnuts. Spread over crust.

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Bake for 30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. Cut into squares or bars.

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*It is recommended to serve with whip topping, but I have to tell you I like it without. You choose!

Date Bar Dessert

Ingredients

  • 1 3/4 cups old-fashioned Oats
  • 1 1/2 cups all-purpose Flour
  • 1 cup packed Brown Sugar
  • 1 tsp Baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 1 cup cold Butter
  • 2 1/2 cups chopped Dates
  • 3/4 cup Sugar
  • 3/4 cup Water
  • 1/2 cup chopped Walnuts

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°.
  2. In a large bowl, combine oats, flour, brown sugar, baking soda and salt. Cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. *I prefer the old school two knives instead of a pastry cutter for this large amount, but do as you please.
  3. Press into a greased 13" x 9" x 2" baking pan.
  4. In a saucepan, combine dates, sugar and water. Cook for 10 minutes or until thickened, stirring frequently. Stir in walnuts. Spread over crust.
  5. Bake for 30 minutes. Cool on a wire rack. Cut into squares or bars.
  6. *It is recommended to serve with whip topping, but I have to tell you I like it without. You choose!
https://sadiesnest.com/date-bar-dessert/

A 4th of July Tale

It was the year of 2012 and I was 8 months pregnant with my third child. It had been a record breaking summer for heat and high temperatures. I usually love the 4th of July, but this year I was having a hard time getting excited about the festivities (or much of anything for that matter). We had started a new family tradition of watching the local fireworks near my parents’ recently purchased cabin in the woods. But honestly, the thought of loading up my kids with bug spray so I could chase waddle after my 18 month old daughter through the crowds of people so my 6 year old could stay out late to watch the fireworks sounded like the opposite of a good time. So when my mom suggested taking the pontoon boat down the river and catching the fireworks from the bay I didn’t hesitate. Thankfully my family and a couple of our close friends who joined in with us for our holiday getaway were graciously accommodating. Our group loaded up the pontoon and the little fishing boat to head 7 miles down the river to see what we could see. We knew the display was a little way down the shore of the great lake Superior, and that our little boats weren’t meant for rough waters -so we wouldn’t be close; but the thought of watching them with my favorite people from the lake was enticing. Once we were in the bay we dropped anchor and tied the boats side by side. We were a little early so we made small talk and indulged in our refreshments. It didn’t take long before I had to go to the bathroom. Great, right? Where was I going to go to the bathroom? The pontoon was equipped with a porta-potty accompanied by a pop-up curtain. Under normal (not-pregnant) circumstances I would have refused, but I had no choice. So everybody made room for my dad to set up the station so I could use the facilities. Except I was too embarrassed about the predicament of only being separated by a boat full of people by a curtain, that I couldn’t go. So naturally I spoke through the fabric barrier and asked everyone if they would politely make some noise, But you know how it is when you ask someone to talk, right? It’s like all of the sudden there is nothing to say. What are we going to talk about? The awkwardness? No, of course not. But what??? So I say, maybe you could sing a song? Perfect. So the first song that popped into one of their heads was Jingle Bells, to which the whole lot quickly jumped in on. The entire ordeal just struck me and I lost it; I couldn’t stop laughing. Here are my loved ones singing Christmas carols on the 4th of July, so I could relieve myself in a make shift bathroom on the back of a pontoon in the middle of a bay. Awesome. To this day I am moved by embarrassment the love and friendship. It was just about dusk so we knew the show was about to start. In the distance we could see a few little fireworks that people were beginning to set off, probably from their back yard. If you held your thumb up you could literally cover the whole firework from your view, seriously no more than an inch of a spark. But that person went all out, because they had a continuous display. Every couple of minutes we could barely make out another firework that would go off in the distance. In the meantime, something had upset my 4 year old niece and she began an inconsolable screaming cry, just a little ambiance to go with the show; of which shortly thereafter we had the realization we were watching! Those little sparks were from the local community display! Now it was time to pack it up and make our way back home. Naturally it was pitch black. The great thing about being out in the woods is that there is a vast amount of nature, however that doesn’t lend us a lot of light. My husband and brother-in-law tried to lead the way to make a path to follow in the fishing boat. The river is protected by the state and kept very natural- which means logs could be floating or better yet lodged and sticking out of the water. This could dangerous for the pontoon, so my friend Molly did her best to keep a spotlight scanning back and forth across the river to shed as much light and information as possible. The fearless leaders did their best to navigate through the dark unknown. We were probably traveling at a pace of about 2-3 miles per hour, and almost half way home when my dad (who is excellent with boats, but had never driven this pontoon at night) flipped a switch and found to all of our surprise that the pontoon had headlights! Wow, that river shone like the sun! And the look on my husband and brother-in-law’s faces was priceless, like watching the transformation of two cave dwellers becoming two stunned deer in head lights. After a couple minutes of adjustment for all, the whole river echoed our combined laughter. To this day it remains the best-worst 4th of July ever.

Featured image courtesy of Ryan French

Loving Lately 🇺🇸

Loving Lately: Fourth of July Ideas

I love the 4th of July. It is red, white & blue, backyard BBQ’s, summer weather and fireworks. Yes, it’s the day we celebrate our independence (for which I am grateful). It also has become everything I associate with a holiday; annual gatherings with family and food with aromas specific to the day. I’m a sucker for flag cakes and sparklers, and I succumb to the bug spray and driving home late- because I am all in baby! (Featured image courtesy of thewinthropcronicles.com)

Let’s just start the day off right. Breakfast anyone? Patriotic Waffle image courtesy of ModernParentsMessyKids.com

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Decorating for the 4th of July can be easy.

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Courtesy of Pinterest

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Courtesy of Pinterest

Dressing for the holiday can get as creative as American Pie…

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Image courtesy of Pinterest

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Courtesy of Pinterest

Speaking of which, is it possible to have too many pies for a holiday? I think not.

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For 4th of July Blueberry Pie check out betsylife.com

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Courtesy of Land O’Lakes

Oh my goodness, then there is cake! How cute are these berry drippings?

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Image courtesy of tasteofhome.com

I think I could handle this 4th of July Sparkle Cake, and can I just tell you how much I love the rustic simplicity of it?

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Image courtesy of Pinterest

Then you’ve got your traditional make the flag out of berries cakes.

While some 4th of July ideas are timeless… some are new to me. I mean I’ve seen the red, white and blue rocket ship popsicle; But I wish I was this creative! Homemade striped popsicles!!!?? I think you’re awesome!

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Popsicle image courtesy of theviewfromgreatisland

Of course if you are looking for a simple idea to make a statement try this… (yes it’s Sangria, but I think it would look pretty in water too!)

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Courtesy of Pinterest

If you can carve a pumpkin maybe…?

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Image courtesy of bhg.com

The crafty folks out there might want to try this jar made patriotic candle holder project from CountryLiving.com…

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Of course you can’t beat this classic sparkler activity for kids and adults alike!

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Image courtesy of Huffington Post

But more than anything, please be safe, enjoy your family & friends and have a Happy 4th of July!

American flag and fireworks

American flag and fireworks image courtesy of Pinterest

Iced Chai Tea Latte

I made this drink for an India themed dinner party. Immediately I knew I would have to share it during the holidays. Honestly it was like the most beautiful thing I had ever tasted. I know that is a strange thing to say, but it really was. It was complex, but simple; like something I’ve never tasted before, but familiar; aromatic and yet subtle. I think it would be special to serve with a meal or to drink alone. Just trust me on this and give it a try. (BTW I did have to find the cardamom pods at an Indian grocer, but I am sure they are available on-line.)

Originally posted on Big Girls Small Kitchen.

Iced Chai Tea Latte
Makes 1 drink

Ingredients
6 tablespoons Chai Tea Concentrate (recipe follows)
1 cup milk of your choice*
Ice

*If you use sweetened almond, soy, or rice milk, you may need to play around to make the concentrate less sugary. This recipe was developed using 2% milk.

Pour both the Chai Tea Concentrate and the milk into a glass, stirring to combine them. Add a large handful of ice, and drink immediately.

You can make this into a hot drink for winter by warming the milk and chai concentrate slowly in a small saucepan until very hot. Serve in a mug.

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Chai Tea Concentrate
Makes 1 1/2 cups, enough for 4 lattes

Ingredients
3 tablespoons sugar
8 cardamom pods
1 cinnamon stick, snapped in half
1 slice ginger, peeled
5 whole cloves
4 whole black peppercorns
2 black teabags
1 tablespoon honey

Combine all ingredients except the honey in a pot. Add 2 cups of water and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Lower slightly and let simmer for 5 minutes. Turn off the heat and let steep for 5 minutes. Remove the teabags, squeezing out any liquid from them. Let the spices steep for another 15 minutes. Strain, removing all the spices. Add the honey and stir in. Taste, adding more honey if you like.

Cool completely.

The concentrate is easily doubled and will last a while in the fridge.

Maple Pecan Pie

I love pecan pie. It’s sweet and sticky, nutty and buttery. My grandma used to make one, in which she would over-bake until it was hard but still chewy and tasted like candy. It’s the only dessert I remember her making. I wish I knew how to replicate that pie! However, years of practice has left me with this family favorite. And I have tasted and made A LOT of pecan pies. In fact, one time I even made about 5 or 6 and had a taste off for family and friends! This was the clear winner. I love that it incorporates the maple syrup in the flavor! It’s honestly one of the most simple pies to make. From my table to yours, I hope you enjoy!

As organic as possible:

2 Eggs

1/2 cup Sugar

1/4 cup Brown sugar

3/4 cup Maple syrup

1/4 cup light Corn syrup

3 Tbsp Butter, melted

1/2 tsp Vanilla

1/4 tsp salt

1 1/2 cups Pecan halves

1 unbaked pie crust (I use Martha Stewart’s Paté Brisée)

Preheat the oven to 375º.

If making your own pie crust, place the dough into pie plate. I reserve a little left over dough to press out Maple leaves, for the “Maple” Pecan pie.

In a large mixing bowl whisk eggs and sugars until creamy. Add syrups, butter, vanilla, salt and mix. Add pecans and stir until incorporated. Pour into pie shell and bake 30 minutes. I use the remnant from the melted butter dish (from the pie filling) to lightly coat the top of the maple leaves. Quickly, place the dough maple leaves in any artistic formation you would like on top of the pie and continue to bake 15-20 minutes, until the center of the pie is set when slightly shaken (not completely unmoving, but not liquid-y). Pie will continue to set while it cools. Allow to cool and set before serving. (It’s a great recipe to make a day ahead!)

Tip: It making the pie ahead of time, do not cover with plastic wrap, it can make it “soggy.” Instead use wax paper or aluminum foil.

Maple Pecan Pie

Ingredients

  • 2 Eggs
  • 1/2 cup Sugar
  • 1/4 cup Brown sugar
  • 3/4 cup Maple syrup
  • 1/4 cup light Corn syrup
  • 3 Tbsp Butter, melted
  • 1/2 tsp Vanilla
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1 1/2 cups Pecan halves
  • 1 unbaked pie crust (I use Martha Stewart's Paté Brisée)

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 375º.
  2. If making your own pie crust, place the dough into pie plate. I reserve a little left over dough to press out Maple leaves, for the "Maple" Pecan pie.
  3. In a large mixing bowl whisk eggs and sugars until creamy.
  4. Add syrups, butter, vanilla, salt and mix. Add pecans and stir until incorporated.
  5. Pour into pie shell and bake 30 minutes. I use the remnant from the melted butter dish (from the pie filling) to lightly coat the top of the maple leaves.
  6. Quickly, place the dough maple leaves in any artistic formation you would like on top of the pie and continue to bake 15-20 minutes, until the center of the pie is set when slightly shaken (not completely unmoving, but not liquid-y).
  7. Pie will continue to set while it cools. Allow to cool and set before serving. (It's a great recipe to make a day ahead!)
  8. Tip: It making the pie ahead of time, do not cover with plastic wrap, it can make it "soggy." Instead use wax paper or aluminum foil.
https://sadiesnest.com/maple-pecan-pie/